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Thursday, August 03, 2017

Annual country reports on open internet from national regulators - 2017 | Digital Single Market

Annual country reports on open internet from national regulators - 2017 | Digital Single Market: "Annual reports of the national regulatory authorities (NRAs) on compliance with the provisions on open internet in their respective countries.

Today the Commission makes available on its website annual country reports from national regulators on open internet.

The reports were prepared by the national regulatory authorities (NRAs) and sent to the Commission and BEREC.

[Note - Germany and Sweden detail infringement proceedings in English - others are problematic unless you read Slovenian, Hungarian and Dutch]

They cover the first 12 months after the open internet rules became applicable on 30 April 2016.

The reports will serve as a basis for BEREC's Report on the implementation of the net neutrality rules expected by the end of the year. The reports will also be used by the Commission in the next Europe's Digital Progress Report in 2018." 'via Blog this'

Tuesday, August 01, 2017

'It's digital colonialism': how Facebook's free internet service has failed its users | Technology | The Guardian

'It's digital colonialism': how Facebook's free internet service has failed its users | Technology | The Guardian: "Whatever Facebook’s true goal, Free Basics offers the company another treasure trove of data: all user activities within the app are channeled through Facebook’s servers. This means Facebook can tell which third-party sites users are looking at, when and for how long.


Free Basics collects metadata relating to browsing activity. “The program has created substantial new avenues for Facebook to gather data about the habits and interests of users in countries where they aspire to have a strong presence, as more users come online,” said Global Voices.

 In spite of its shortcomings, Free Basics has grown rapidly and, according to Facebook, is used by 50m people. However, it’s mostly used by people who want to extend their mobile data package for free as opposed to connecting those who previously didn’t have access to the internet – an audience Facebook has repeatedly stated it is trying to reach.

 “It is not a great approach for bringing people online, but it’s really good at saving costs for people already online,” said Dhanaraj Thakur, of the Alliance for Affordable Internet.

“The narrative Facebook is concerned with is about increasing access, but there’s a lack of empirical evidence. But that’s the whole point of the project!”

 Facebook refused to answer questions about how many people it had brought online for the first time, how it places content within the apps or how the company measures the success of the scheme. However, the company pointed out the report only looked at a few markets and that it is an open platform for which any content provider can adapt their services." 'via Blog this'

Friday, July 28, 2017

'It's digital colonialism': how Facebook's free internet service has failed its users: Guardian

'It's digital colonialism': how Facebook's free internet service has failed its users | Technology | The Guardian: "“The narrative Facebook is concerned with is about increasing access, but there’s a lack of empirical evidence. But that’s the whole point of the project!”

 Facebook refused to answer questions about how many people it had brought online for the first time, how it places content within the apps or how the company measures the success of the scheme. However, the company pointed out the report only looked at a few markets and that it is an open platform for which any content provider can adapt their services." 'via Blog this'

Thursday, July 27, 2017

¿Quién debe responder por la neutralidad de la red? • ENTER.CO

¿Quién debe responder por la neutralidad de la red? • ENTER.CO: "¡En Colombia la gente paga por enviarse mensajes! ¿Acaso nos encontramos en 1920 como la industria del telegrama? Las empresas de telecomunicaciones crean “bizarre price plans (planes de precios extravagantes)”, en su afán por generar negocio a partir de internet. E internet no funciona así. Necesitan competir y conseguir planes para financiarse (creo que sería bueno que nos preguntáramos más seguido de dónde sale el dinero).

 Al final, el usuario debería poder elegir, pero ante opciones más transparentes. En el Reino Unido las personas ya ni siquiera contratan un plan de telefonía fijo, es raro. Pero he visto que en Colombia las empresas de telecomunicaciones te ofrecen en sus planes cosas como ‘adquiere este plan con teléfono fijo, internet…’ ¿Teléfono fijo? ¿Por qué teléfono fijo? Es raro." 'via Blog this'

Con la neutralidad de la red se juega el futuro de internet

Con la neutralidad de la red se juega el futuro de internet: "La explosión del uso de datos móviles implica que todo baja de precio, la tecnología, el almacenamiento, y todos deberíamos esperar tener condiciones como las de Finlandia en unos tres años. El problema de que los reguladores permitan el “zero rating” sin mayor escrutinio es que puede volverse una condición normal del mercado, cuando deberían obligar a las compañías a ofrecer acceso a datos más barato cada año.

 La normalización de esta práctica también viene por cuenta de algo que he llamado zero washing y funciona de la misma forma en que las compañías de petróleo se pintan como amigables con el medio ambiente: uno ve fotos de niños sonriendo en campos verdes al lado del logo de una petrolera, por ejemplo." 'via Blog this'

Monday, July 24, 2017

SNL: Former BT CTO: 5G not 'as transformative as people like to think'

SNL: Q&A: Former BT CTO: 5G not 'as transformative as people like to think': "The reality is, I don't think 5G is quite as transformative as people like to think. For operators to make a success of 5G, they will need 10 times more towers than they've already got — and this will be a stretch.

Less than 5% of all internet and digital connection is through 3G and 4G. Meanwhile, approximately 55% of all digital connections on mobile devices use Wi-Fi and the rest are on fixed line.

Will 5G change that? I think it is very unlikely.

Will 5G be a big player in the internet of things? Again, very unlikely. It is interesting that all of the mobile companies will offer me Wi-Fi access to their networks in order to encourage me not to use their 4G because they do not have the capacity. So there are a number of impediments." 'via Blog this'

Friday, July 21, 2017

Verizon admits to throttling video in apparent violation of net neutrality - The Verge

Verizon admits to throttling video in apparent violation of net neutrality - The Verge: "Yesterday, we reported that Verizon Wireless appeared to be throttling Netflix traffic, — and today, the company seems to have come clean. In a statement provided to Ars Technica and The Verge, Verizon implicitly admitted to capping the traffic, blaming the issue on a temporary video optimization test.

 “We've been doing network testing over the past few days to optimize the performance of video applications on our network," a Verizon Wireless spokesperson said. “The testing should be completed shortly. The customer video experience was not affected.”" 'via Blog this'