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Tuesday, February 28, 2017

MWC 2017: Wikipedia goes data-free in Iraq - BBC News

MWC 2017: Wikipedia goes data-free in Iraq - BBC News: "The free programme begins on 28 February and was revealed at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.

The Wikimedia Foundation states on its website that it does not pay mobile phone providers who sign up to the programme and they do not get any editorial control over the platform." 'via Blog this'

Rise of the Apps: How OTT Traffic is Balancing a Carrier Slump

Rise of the Apps: How OTT Traffic is Balancing a Carrier Slump: "TeleGeography has fairly reliable estimates of Skype’s traffic through 2013, when the company carried 214 billion minutes of on-net (Skype-to-Skype) international traffic. Telcos terminated 547 billion minutes of international traffic in 2013, and Skype plus carrier traffic totaled 761 billion minutes.

 If we assume that total (carrier plus OTT) demand for international communications has continued to grow at a relatively modest 13% annually since 2013, the combined volume of carrier and OTT international traffic would have expanded to 971 billion minutes in 2015, and to just under 1.1 trillion minutes in 2016.

As traditional carrier traffic has slumped, OTT traffic has risen to fill the void." 'via Blog this'

Ignore the GSMA's "Advanced Messaging"​, RCS & "Universal Profile"​ | Dean Bubley

Ignore the GSMA's "Advanced Messaging"​, RCS & "Universal Profile"​ | Dean Bubley | Pulse | LinkedIn: "The project started in 2007, and emerged as a lukewarm 2008 IM concept for featurephones in the days when both iOS and Facebook where just emerging onto the stage. I described it as a "coalition of the losers" in a report in 2010. It evolved to a dead-on-arrival branded app called "joyn" as smartphones gained traction, and it has tried climbing out of its grave so many times since that I describe it as a zombie. Various operators have deployed it, then given up - even in markets like Spain and South Korea where multiple operators offered it at first." 'via Blog this'

Thursday, February 23, 2017

BBC Internet Blog - Balancing, spikes & speed: Architecting media distribution cloud services

BBC Blogs - Internet Blog - Balancing, spikes & speed: Architecting media distribution cloud services: "In the Media Distribution team, our main systems are content caching servers, known as caching cells, that make up the BIDI Content Distribution Network (CDN). For these systems, we still rely heavily on physical machine deployments to meet our performance requirements. The caching cells also need to be deployed in certain geographical locations, meaning that a cloud based architecture restricted to Amazon’s data centres wouldn’t work, even if the performance were good enough.

Not all of our services in BIDI have to be deployed like that, however. The “brain” of the platform, which deals with traffic management and configuration, is a suite of micro services which aren’t tied to any particular data centre. For these services, AWS/Cosmos promises faster deployments and less operational overhead than our internal deployment platforms. It’s often cheaper in the end as well, even though AWS’ fine-grained pricing model makes it hard to quickly determine whether that’s going to be the case.

 One of the BIDI related services that we decided to deploy in the cloud is called Croupier and is used when making decisions about which CDN to redirect BBC iPlayer clients to. Croupier is a lookup service which provides an HTTP GET endpoint where the iPlayer client’s IP is a parameter. The service is internal: it is only used by another (AWS based) BBC service called Media Selector, which is called by iPlayer before the user actually gets to see any video." 'via Blog this'

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Walden Shies Away From Big Communications Act Overhaul | Bloomberg BNA

Walden Shies Away From Big Communications Act Overhaul | Bloomberg BNA: "Walden said Congress could defer to the broadband industry unless it identifies a particular problem requiring a legislative fix. “The marketplace is changing so rapidly, and if the marketplace can handle it, then the marketplace should,” he said.

 He also plans to defer to Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.), who chairs the committee’s Communications and Technology Subcommittee, on launching telecom policy initiatives." 'via Blog this'

Monday, February 13, 2017

Republicans are ready to take down the FCC - The Verge

Republicans are ready to take down the FCC - The Verge: "That kind of change can’t just happen with a directive from Pai. An agency restructuring that would strip it of antitrust abilities in theory requires an act of Congress. “It’s difficult for [the FCC] to say, ‘Well this doesn't work anymore,’” Jamison says. “The law is still there, so that's really up to Congress to update those laws.”

 And rewriting telecom law isn’t easy. It’s traditionally been a bipartisan effort, and given the margins in Congress, it would have to be here, too.

"I assume any effort to update the Telecommunications Act would end up being bipartisan again this time around for it to be longstanding and have the consensus of what all stakeholders want," says Lewis, of Public Knowledge.  "It will take some time because it's a complicated and long act."

 “Do you know how many years it took to write the Telecom Act of 1996?” Eshoo asks. “Oh my God. It was at least a decade.”" 'via Blog this'

Friday, February 10, 2017

Connected Nations 2016 - Ofcom: Section 6 Internet Access

Connected Nations 2016 - Ofcom: "The highlights are:

 A major package of new regulatory obligations, coupled with complementary enforcement powers for regulators, is in the process of implementation. This will result in greater transparency in how ISPs manage traffic, market their services and contract with customers.

ISPs have already been improving the information they provide to consumers about the use of traffic management on their networks as part of a voluntary code of practice administered by the Broadband Stakeholder Group (BSG). Current traffic management practices in widespread use have minimal or no impact on most users on fixed networks but, given the fixed capacity and variable demand in specific parts of mobile networks, may have an appreciable effect on mobile users during peak periods in busy areas.

The amount of internet data being delivered to consumers by major video content providers continues to increase. The use of content delivery networks (CDNs) also continues to increase: internet content is increasingly being served from caching servers embedded in the ISPs’ access networks and provided by the content providers.

Larger-scale ISPs are progressively introducing support for the latest IPv6 internet addressing system;
The lack of security of Internet of Things (IoT) and other low cost internet connected devices is leading to their being targeted by malware and their use to launch distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks, increasing concerns over security of personal data." 'via Blog this'